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Frequently Asked Questions
 
  1. How do I apply for a non-immigrant visa?
  2. How long do I have to wait to get a non-immigrant visa interview?
  3. What should I bring with me to my non-immigrant visa interview?
  4. Should I have my documents translated into English?
  5. Is an invitation letter required?
  6. Does a minor child need to come for his/her visa interview?
  7. When do I find out the result of my interview? When do I get my passport back?
  8. My application was refused under Section 221(g). What do I do next?
  9. My application was refused under Section 214(b). What do I do next?
  10. Who may I call to discuss my denied visa application?
  11. I have a visa that is still valid in my old passport, but the passport has expired. Can I still use that visa, or do I need to get it transferred to my new passport?
  12. I recently changed my marital status and now have a new passport that reflects my new name. May I still travel with my visa in my former name?
  13. Should I purchase my airline tickets in advance to prove that I really want a visa and to validate my destination?
  14. How can I work legally in the U.S.?
  15. Are there any special requirements when applying for a business visa?
  16. How do I find out about educational opportunities in the U.S.?
  17. May I apply for a U.S. visa in Bucharest if I am not a Romanian citizen?
  18. May I apply for a U.S. visa in Bucharest if I am a Romanian citizen currently living and/or working in another country?
  19. I applied for a visa for the first time one year ago. Should I submit a new DS-160 application form?
  20. The validity of my Romanian passport is less than 6 months and I have a valid visa. Can I travel to the US with my current passport?
  21. Where can I find the instructions on the Visa Renewal procedure?
  22. How can I retrieve a DS-160 application form?
  23. What specific visa application documents are required for a child?
  24. I need to know what documents the consular officer will retain during the interview.
  25. I received a letter at the interview. How should I proceed?
  26. I forgot to turn in my I-94 when I left the U.S., what should I do?

 

  1. How do I apply for a non-immigrant visa?

    With a few exceptions, all visa applicants must apply for a visa in person. To schedule a visa interview, follow the steps available at http://www.ustraveldocs.com/ro

  2. How long do I have to wait to get a non-immigrant visa interview?

    Wait times vary depending on the time of year and demand for appointments. To check the current visa wait times, click here: http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/english.html.

  3. What should I bring with me to my non-immigrant visa interview?

    The following items are mandatory for all applicants regardless of visa type:

    • a valid passport;
    • one photo (See Photo Requirements); and
    • the print out of the confirmation page of the electronic submission of the DS-160 application form.

    You may also bring any documents that demonstrate your personal and economic ties to Romania. Examples include:

    • proof of current employment and past work history;
    • evidence of financial support (including bank statements, salary history or pension statements if retired);
    • proof of property ownership (i.e. home, land, business); and
    • business statements and accounts (if you own a firm).

    The following additional documents are also sometimes helpful for the consular officer:

    • proof of the citizenship or residence status of the person you are intending to visit in the U.S. (such as copies or originals of visas, green cards or passports); and
    • old passports showing previous international travel.
    • if you have a passport with a U.S. visa that is still valid, you must bring it at the time of the interview.

    Note - Depending on the type of visa for which you are applying, additional documents may be required. For a list of required documents for each visa type, use the NIV visa links in the list under non-immigrant visas.

  4. Should I have my documents translated into English?

    It is not necessary to have your documents translated into English for a non-immigrant visa application. Applicants must bring original documents rather than photocopies.

  5. Is an invitation letter required?

    One of the most common misconceptions regarding non-immigrant visas is that someone can act as a sponsor or offer to guarantee a person's return to their home country. We receive many such well-intentioned letters; however, U.S. immigration law makes no provisions for any such guarantees.

    The fundamental rule of applying for a visa is that an applicant must qualify based on his or her own circumstances. If you wish to submit information to us in support of an applicant, please send it directly to the applicant. The applicant can then share it with us during his/her interview, or can include it with his/her documents.

  6. Does a minor child need to come for his/her visa interview?

    Generally, any applicant under 14 years of age does not need to be present at the interview. However, any visa applicant between the ages of 14 and 17 years old must be accompanied by at least one parent or legal guardian. If only one parent is present at the visa interview, the consular officer will ask to see a notarized declaration from the other parent giving permission for the child to travel to the U.S. or an original custody agreement showing sole custody.

  7. When do I find out the result of my interview? When do I get my passport back?

    In most cases, the consular officer will make a decision at the conclusion of the visa interview. If an applicant qualifies for a visa, the visa and passport will be ready the following business day. The passports will be collected from the TNT offices. If the applicant does not qualify for a visa, the passport is returned at the conclusion of the visa interview along with a letter explaining the legal basis for the refusal. In some cases, visa applicants are asked to come back at a later date with additional documentation.

  8. My application was refused under Section 221(g). What do I do next?

    • If the consular officer requested additional documents, please send them along with your passport by TNT courier, following the instructions on http://www.ustraveldocs.com/ro/ under the “Application Pending Further Action” Section.
    • If your presence is requested, please appear at the Consular Section Monday through Thursday, between 09:00 am – 10:00 am effective July 5th 2016.
  9. My application was refused under Section 214(b). What do I do next?

    If your application for a non-immigrant visa has been refused, you will be told why at the interview and provided with a written explanation. Section 214(b) of U.S. Immigration Law presumes that applicants for non-immigrant visas are intending immigrants and must be denied visas unless they provide convincing evidence of family, social, and economic ties to a residence abroad. Refusals under Section 214(b) mean that you have not overcome the legal presumption that you are an intending immigrant.

    The fact that you were refused under Section 214(b) does not mean that you will always be refused in the future if your make new applications. A refusal under Section 214(b) means that, at the time of your interview, under your present employment, social and other circumstances, the consular officer was not satisfied that you had met U.S. non-immigrant visa requirements.

    Although anyone may re-apply for a visa, we recommend that you do so only if there is a significant change in your circumstances since your last interview. If you reapply after being refused under Section 214(b), you must complete a new application and pay another application fee.

  10. Who may I call to discuss my denied visa application?

    Immigration law delegates the responsibility for the issuance or refusal of visas to consular officers overseas. These officers have the final say on all visa cases. Refusals under 214(b) are not appealable, but neither are they necessarily permanent. A change in the circumstances of a refused applicant may provide an opportunity for a new, successful application. The necessity of proving strong ties to Romania, just as in a previous interview, remains the same. If you would like to submit a comment or question about your interview, please send an e-mail to VisasBucharest@state.gov.

  11. I have a visa that is still valid in my old passport, but the passport has expired. Can I still use that visa, or do I need to get it transferred to my new passport?

    You can travel with both the old passport containing the valid U.S. visa and the new passport. It is not necessary to get a new visa if the visa is still valid and has not been cancelled or damaged. It is not possible to transfer a visa from the old passport to the new without making a new visa application.

  12. I recently changed my marital status and now have a new passport that reflects my new name. May I still travel with my visa in my former name?

    Yes, you may; however, it is recommended that you reapply for a new visa in order to update your name. Should you decide to travel with the visa in your former name, bring the original documentation that shows your change of marital status (divorce decree, marriage certificate, death certificate, etc.) in order to present it to the immigration authorities at the port of entry in case such proof is requested.

  13. Should I purchase my airline tickets in advance to prove that I really want a visa and to validate my destination?

    No.  Do not purchase airline tickets before obtaining a visa. Possession of pre-paid airline tickets to the U.S. will not be a factor in the consular officer’s decision. The only exception to this is if you are applying for a transit visa and are traveling through the U.S. on your way to another destination.

  14. How can I work legally in the U.S.?

    In most cases, the employer in the U.S. must file a work petition with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in order to employ a foreign national in the U.S. After the petition has been approved, the USCIS will inform the applicant in writing with a form I-797 known as a "Notice of Action." Once the applicant has the I-797, he/she can schedule a visa interview.

  15. Are there any special requirements when applying for a business visa?

    Applicants traveling for business purposes, like other applicants, are required to demonstrate strong personal and economic ties to Romania that will compel them to return to Romania after a brief visit. They must also demonstrate that they plan to travel to the U.S. on bona fide business. This is often done by providing an invitation from a U.S. company as well as documents that establish an ongoing or proposed business relationship(s) between that company and the Romanian employer.

  16. How do I find out about educational opportunities in the U.S.?

    The best resource for researching educational opportunities in the U.S. is the Fulbright Educational Advising Center.

  17. May I apply for a U.S. visa in Bucharest if I am not a Romanian citizen?

    Yes. Anyone who resides in, or is physically present in Romania, may apply for a visa at the Embassy in Bucharest. If you do not reside in Romania, you should be aware that language difficulties and interviewing officers' unfamiliarity with local conditions in other countries may make it more difficult for you to demonstrate your qualifications for a visa here than in your home district or at a post designated for your application. Even if an applicant qualifies for a visa, there can be visa processing delays ranging from several days to several months. Therefore, you should also take into account whether you will be in Romania for a sufficient period of time to complete visa processing.

  18. May I apply for a U.S. visa in Bucharest if I am a Romanian citizen currently living and/or working in another country?

    Yes. Anyone who resides in, or is physically present in Romania, may apply for a visa at the Embassy in Bucharest. If you do not reside in Romania, you should be aware that language difficulties and interviewing officers' unfamiliarity with local conditions in other countries may make it more difficult for you to demonstrate your qualifications for a visa here than in your home district or at a post designated for your application. Even if an applicant qualifies for a visa, there can be visa processing delays ranging from several days to several months. Therefore, you should also take into account whether you will be in Romania for a sufficient period of time to complete visa processing.

  19. I applied for a visa for the first time one year ago. Should I submit a new DS-160 application form?

    You must fill out and electronically submit a new DS-160 form each time you apply for a new visa.

  20. The validity of my Romanian passport is less than 6 months and I have a valid visa. Can I travel to the US with my current passport?

    Yes. Romanians may travel to the U.S. with a passport that will expire during the next six months as long as they have a valid U.S. visa. Furthermore, just because your Romanian passport will soon expire, or may have already expired, does not mean that a valid U.S. visa has become invalid. You can also travel to the U.S. on a new Romanian passport and an expired Romanian passport that has a still-valid U.S. visa in it. If the validity of your passport expires while you are in the United States, however, you will need to apply to the nearest Romanian Consulate for a new one.

  21. Where can I find the instructions on the Visa Renewal procedure?

    Information on Visa Renewal procedure is available here.

  22. How can I retrieve a DS-160 application form?

    Please access https://ceac.state.gov/genniv/, select the third option "RETRIEVE AN APPLICATION", enter your Application ID and select "Retrieve Application" button. Enter the first five letters of your family name, year of birth and the answer for the security question.

  23. What specific visa application documents are required for a child?

    Please visit our website section with specific information about visa for minors.

  24. I need to know what documents the consular officer will retain during the interview.

    If the visa is approved, the consular officer will keep your passport, the DS-160 confirmation page and the visa application bank receipt/proof of payment. If your visa application is denied, the consular officer will keep the DS-160 confirmation page and the visa application bank receipt/proof of payment.

  25. I received a letter at the interview. How should I proceed?

    221(g) - Yellow Letter - it means we need more documents.

    If you were issued a 221(g) letter and asked to come back when you are prepared with all the required information or documents. You may appear at the Consular Section from Monday through Thursday at 9:00 am, or you may send the documents, your passport and your 221(g) letter back to the Embassy through TNT, based on the consular officer's decision.

    214(b) - White Letter - it means your visa application was denied.

    If your application for a non-immigrant visa has been refused, you will be told why at the interview and provided with a written explanation. Section 214(b) of U.S. Immigration Law presumes that applicants for non-immigrant visas are intending immigrants and must be denied visas unless they provide convincing evidence of family, social, and economic ties to a residence abroad. Refusals under Section 214(b) mean that you have not overcome the legal presumption that you are an intending immigrant.

    The fact that you were refused under Section 214(b) does not mean that you will always be refused in the future if your make new applications. A refusal under Section 214(b) means that, at the time of your interview, under your present employment, social and other circumstances, the consular officer was not satisfied that you had met U.S. non-immigrant visa requirements.

    Although anyone may re-apply for a visa, we recommend that you do so only if there is a significant change in your circumstances since your last interview. If you reapply after being refused under Section 214(b), you must complete a new application and pay another application fee.

  26. I forgot to turn in my I-94 when I left the U.S., what should I do?

    Most travelers will have an electronic I-94, however, if you entered the United States via a land border port of entry or were provided a paper Form I-94 at an air or seaport and returned home with your Form I-94 (white) or, if you arrived by land under the Visa Waiver Program, Form I-94W (green) Departure Record in your passport, it is possible that your departure was not recorded properly.

    If you failed to turn in your I-94 Departure Record, please send it, along with any documentation that proves you left the United States. As of November 1, 2014, the address is:

    Coleman Data Solutions

    Box 7965

    Akron, OH 44306

    Attn: NIDPS (I-94)

    USA

    (If using U.S. Postal Service)

    OR

    Coleman Data Solutions

    3043 Sanitarium Road, Suite 2

    Akron, OH 44312

    Attn: NIDPS (I-94)

    (If using FedEx or UPS)

    Do not mail your Form I-94 Departure Record or supporting information to any U.S. Consulate or Embassy, to any other CBP Office in the United States, or to any address other than the one above. Only at this location are we able to make the necessary corrections to CBP records to prevent inconvenience to you in the future. Coleman Data Solutions does not answer correspondence, so please do not ask for confirmation that your record has been updated. For further information, please visit the U.S. Customs and Border Protection website.